Suboxone

Uses for Suboxone

Suboxone is a variation of buprenorphine and is used to ease the pain of withdrawing off of opiates.  Reckitt Benckiser, a consumer health products company, originally marketed Suboxone in the 1980’s as a pain reliever for treating severe, chronic pain. In 2000, the FDA found suboxone to be an effective alternative to Methadone for opiate addiction because of its non-euphoric effects and the low chance of users getting addicted. Since the FDA has approved suboxone, it has also been approved in Europe and to be produced by a variety of companies. After witnessing the high success rates since its approval, drug and alcohol treatment facilities have began using it for their detoxification programs.

Suboxone is a mix of buprenorphine and naloxone with a 4:1 ratio. Suboxone is an orange tablet or film that is available in four dosages, 2mg, 4mg, 8mg, and 12 mg. It is most popularly known for preventing opiate abuse because it is mixed with naloxone. When naloxone is in the blood stream the effects of buprenorphine are blocked so the patient cannot use Suboxone to get high like other detox drugs. It is not used recreationally because the drug itself is not as strong as opiate abusers are used to and therefor only cause further withdrawal symptoms.

Although patients cannot abuse Suboxone, it is a drug that can cause drug dependence. When first taking this drug for opiate withdrawal you will experience some withdrawal symptoms from the previously abused opiate. As time progresses, Suboxone will elevate a lot of these withdrawal symptoms. When stopping the medication suddenly you will experience withdrawal symptoms. To avoid this happening Doctors will always gradually reduce the dose to avoid withdrawal symptoms.  

Suboxone has proven to be an effective treatment of opiate withdrawal and addiction in the past 12 years and the results are constantly growing. Please specify to your doctor all of the drugs you are taking before considering the use of Suboxone.

All drugs prescribed during detox are determined by our medical staff upon admission and after a  comprehensive medical examination.